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Blue Eyes

The close-up view of each stone type shows a relatively true image of the crystalline structure and the colouring. This is suitable for grained slabs to a limited extend only. In regard to the colour matching, please take an original sample of the stone from your furniture store as a basis.

Petrography

Blue Eyes is a bright grey, medium-grained rock that is almost mono-mineral - consisting mainly of labradorite. According to position and angle, individual, startlingly bright blue to green-bluish, shimmering labradorite crystals, in relatively even distribution, sparkle over the polished surface. The marvellous blue sheen is produced by fine refraction lamella within the crystals of the labradorite. The black silicate fractions may sometimes appear stripe-like in the otherwise homogenous plate structure, differing block by block. 

Petrogenesis

Geologists describe igneous rocks where the feldspar contains mostly calcium as anorthites. Blue Eyes is made up of labradorite for the most part. Anorthites occur as independently existing plutons (complexes of igneous rocks) but more frequently as layers and bands in differentiated gabbro plutons. As a consequence of very extended periods of cooling, over millions of years, the magmas crystallised out into massive, medium to coarse- grained, igneous rock.

Hardness Hard Stone
Structure Type Homogeneous Structure
Synonyms Labrador Blue Eyes
Group Plutonic rock - Plutonite
Petrographic Assignment Granite-anorthite
Age 600 to 550 million years (Precambrian)
Colouring Minerals White brownish, light dark grey plagioclase (labradorite)
Average Hardness 6-7 (according to Mohs's hardness scale 1-10) / Natural stone
Deposit Canada - on the north coast of the Peninsula Labrador/Canada near the town of Nain